The Dunedin Amenities Society

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The ink on the Dunedin City Council’s 2015 Long Term Plan is nearly dry for yet another year and undoubtedly there will be some winners and losers in the community. Annually the Dunedin Amenities Society fronts up to the City Council to promote the values and landscape of the city seeking reassurances that funding won’t be lost or reduced. The other aspect of the Society’s submissions over the years has been the worrying trend… Read More

Its time to get your walking shoes on again and explore one of Dunedin’s great natural and historical landscapes. The Town Belt Traverse is an 8.2 kilometre from the Southern Cemetery to Woodhaugh Gardens taking in the heart of the Dunedin Town Belt on Sunday 29th March. The great thing about it is its absolutely free! The route is a pram friendly event for people of all ages stopping off at five points… Read More

One of the most famous lines from “The Wizard of Oz” is when Dorothy says to her little dog “Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.” That particular line has become a cultural metaphor used when we visit places or see things  that are not familiar to us and we relate them back to our own personal vision of the world. That same cultural metaphor may well apply to the proposals being… Read More

Dunedin City has largely  been shaped by its natural environment, with its steep hills and gullies running outwards to the harbour and the wide flat estuarine wetlands of south Dunedin known as Kaituna. The physical geography dominated early colonial development around the harbour due to the accessibility to the port for shipping transport and the narrowness of the available commercial land for the early city to be constructed upon. As Dunedin moved from a pioneering city… Read More

The recent Draft Economic Development Strategy undertaken by the Dunedin City Council was an opportunity for the Dunedin Amenities Society to put its views on the economic pathway outlined for the city. The development of such a strategy is an important step for the future of Dunedin, but it’s not the first time that the Society have advised the Council and its citizens that Dunedin has much to offer. In September 1888 Dunedin… Read More

On the 11th of September 1888 Dunedin lawyer Alexander Bathgate read an address to the Otago Institute entitled “The development and conservation of the amenities of Dunedin and its neighbour-hood.” The address was the catalyst for the foundation of the Dunedin and Suburban Reserves Conservation Society, the fore-runner of the Dunedin Amenities Society. Bathgate outlined a vision for Dunedin that was so detailed in its construction that he apologised to his audience… Read More

There’s an old saying that “you never get a second chance to make a first impression” and it certainly applies to the northern entrance to Dunedin. The first impression of Dunedin from Pine Hill Road is inviting and promising as you look over the Leith Valley, across the central city and out to the Pacific Ocean. Unfortunately, that promising first impression is then deflected onto the ugly steel tubing fence that runs along the pedestrian footpath like two drunken parallel worms. This ugly… Read More

The people pictured in the car  didn’t throw the rubbish out of the window, but have a look at how close the brand new bin is beside the parking area. Was it too much to walk over and put the remains of the Colonel’s secret herbs and spices into the bin? Littering like this makes our city look awful and casts a blight on our reputation as a clean green place to… Read More

There’s no doubt that the scrap yard along the motorway adjacent to the Oval is a work in progress. It’s hard to know whose work in progress it belongs too though. Is it the City Council’s District Plan for allowing this activity in the first instance? Perhaps it belongs to Transit for its lack of any vegetation on the adjacent area which fails to create any coherent screening from both visual and noise effects? Or is it the landowners at Everitt’s… Read More

The Dunedin Amenities Society has always recognised the importance and prestige for Dunedin in having an internationally acclaimed botanic gardens in our City. The Gardens and its staff  provide a standard of  excellence in Dunedin that is not found in many cities around the world. Importantly the gardens provides industry training that develops new generations of horticulturists and plant collection managers through the apprentices who study and train within its grounds. Sadly, that international recognition and reputation is neither valued or recognised  by the majority of Dunedin’s… Read More