Shoreline Walk Revisited

ec9644531de25b88a31694b17d415410Valentine’s Day is a day for lovers and romance, and on a warm Dunedin afternoon a group of fifty history and heritage lovers made their way around Dunedin’s shoreline trail. After an overview presentation at Toitu from Heritage New Zealand archaeologist and Society member Paul Pope, the group took the central city shoreline tour. The route follows the 1865 Dunedin shoreline and includes the original prison, lagoon, Octagon, site of Otepoti and Queens Gardens. It was a very enjoyable to be able to share this great insight into our city’s history. The popularity of the shoreline trail adds to the enthusiasm for making this a permanent attraction. (Click on the pictures to see larger view)

Matt talking about the 1848 landing site

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Craigieburn and Toitu

Craigieburn RimuThe development of a pilot education programme with Toitu – Otago Settlers Museum is a great opportunity to bring the Craigieburn story to a new and young audience. As an organisation the Dunedin Amenities Society has a role in providing opportunities for learning with a view to developing the future landscape, environmental and heritage stewards of the future. That’s a mantle we should be prepared to pass onto others not as a burden but as a pleasure and privilege. With the development of the partnership programme we’ll see 300 children visit Craigieburn this term and they’ll experience hands on what colonial life was like in the forests of nineteenth century Dunedin. Importantly too, they’ll be able to learn more about the unique conservation legacy that Craigieburn has with its rich rimu forest. This programme will also bring teachers and parents into contact with Craigieburn and the values of the Society and hopefully that will inspire them to explore the City, their roots and our environment further.

This is an exciting opportunity for the Society, Toitu and the City Council to create a strong partnership that adds value to our community and one of Dunedin’s really special places.

Read the Otago Daily Times article here…