The Dunedin Amenities Society

Archives

Its time to get your walking shoes on again and explore one of Dunedin’s great natural and historical landscapes. The Town Belt Traverse is an 8.2 kilometre from the Southern Cemetery to Woodhaugh Gardens taking in the heart of the Dunedin Town Belt on Sunday 23rd April and its absolutely free! The route is a pram friendly (3 wheel buggies with some help)  event for people of all ages stopping off at five points… Read More

Recently the Dunedin City Council called for submissions on the potential sites for the proposed new pool in Mosgiel. Despite people’s views on whether a pool is actually needed in Mosgiel the selection of sites for the pool is a contentious issue. The selection of four sites was provided in the Council’s consultation information, one was the existing pool site and the other three were variations on occupying part of Mosgiel Memorial… Read More

The Dunedin Amenities Society like any organisation takes a close look at the Annual Plan of the City Council each year and usually submits on the areas that the Society has the greatest interest or concern. The Annual Plan process seems an onerous one but ultimately, it’s an important one to participate in. This year the Society has concentrated on the success of the Town Belt Traverse in 2013 with a call… Read More

There’s been a plethora of comment in the media over the proposed Wharf Street Hotel development. The Amenities Society would be interested in polling people’s opinion as to what they think about the proposal. So take the time to answer this simple poll. You’re welcome to make comments after voting through the polling process. Comments will be moderated and the poll is anonymous. Related articles Down by the Waterfront (dunedin-amenities-society.org.nz)

Dunedin City has largely  been shaped by its natural environment, with its steep hills and gullies running outwards to the harbour and the wide flat estuarine wetlands of south Dunedin known as Kaituna. The physical geography dominated early colonial development around the harbour due to the accessibility to the port for shipping transport and the narrowness of the available commercial land for the early city to be constructed upon. As Dunedin moved from a pioneering city… Read More

It was with considerable concern that the Society read of the plight of two of the trees growing in Anzac avenue. The Avenue trees are an important landscape and heritage feature of the city that dates back to the work of prominent New Zealand architect Edmund Anscombe and the development of the 1925-1926 New Zealand and South Seas International Exhibition. Edmund Anscombe was an important figure in the architectural and town planning industry at both a… Read More