The Dunedin Amenities Society

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2013 is a watershed moment for the Dunedin Amenities Society as it counts down towards the 125th anniversary of its foundation. Conceived on October 15th 1888, the Society is New Zealand’s oldest and longest running environmental organisation. It’s an enviable record of longevity and relevance which any organisation should be justifiably proud, and one that the Society will no doubt celebrate with the public of Dunedin. As an organisation the Society has made a significant mark on the city through its development of… Read More

Ocean Beach Domain is an important coastal barrier for the protection of the city as well as a key recreational asset. However, the continued ravages of the coastline by storm events and the latest destruction of the accessways at the sea wall leave the area in a perilous state. The city runs the risk of losing the battle to retain one of its iconic recreational and coastal areas. The City Council faces some hard decisions over… Read More

It’s been difficult to believe that the vehicle users lobby are suggesting that better walking and cycling access on John Wilson Drive is a form of selfishness. The fact that John Wilson Drive has been dominated by motor vehicles for the last 50 years does not seem to have entered the equation. Worse still, the public have been asked to suffer the burden of the destruction of the scenic qualities of the Drive… Read More

Restoration work has progressed quickly over the last 3 weeks on the byre restoration in the central paddock at Craigieburn. After the initial clearance and excavation the strengthening and realignment of the structural stone walls is close to completion. The boxing for the renewal of the former dairy and milking shed floor will be ready by late this week in preparation for the pouring of a new section of concrete floor. The floor… Read More

The Dunedin Amenities Society have been writing and presenting submissions to the City Council since 1888. While many people may question the validity of the Annual Plan process, the Society have always actively sought to put its views on a variety of issues to the Council. The only thing that groups like the Society can expect from the Annual Plan process is a fair hearing, and we like others took our turn… Read More

The preservation work on the small ruin adjacent to the public track to Ross Creek is now finished with the completion of the stone work and stabilisation of the structure. There is a noticeable increase in the “robustness” of the ruin now and it should now remain as an important heritage feature for a further 150 years. When one looks at the stone and clay work undertaken in the repair, there is a glimpse into the way… Read More

John Wilson Drive continues to polarize the Dunedin community between those who want the opportunity to enjoy the area free of vehicles and those who see the change in use as a form of selfishness. The interesting point is that the Drive has never really been closed to the public, except when construction work was being undertaken on the pipeline and it was hazardous for the public. It’s worth remembering  that John Wilson… Read More

On the 11th of September 1888 Dunedin lawyer Alexander Bathgate read an address to the Otago Institute entitled “The development and conservation of the amenities of Dunedin and its neighbour-hood.” The address was the catalyst for the foundation of the Dunedin and Suburban Reserves Conservation Society, the fore-runner of the Dunedin Amenities Society. Bathgate outlined a vision for Dunedin that was so detailed in its construction that he apologised to his audience… Read More

There’s an old saying that “you never get a second chance to make a first impression” and it certainly applies to the northern entrance to Dunedin. The first impression of Dunedin from Pine Hill Road is inviting and promising as you look over the Leith Valley, across the central city and out to the Pacific Ocean. Unfortunately, that promising first impression is then deflected onto the ugly steel tubing fence that runs along the pedestrian footpath like two drunken parallel worms. This ugly… Read More

Robin Hood Park in the Town Belt has been a traditional area for viewing the City since 1954, and was known as the “Queens View”. The area has become overgrown and the seats vandalised and the Society would like to see the area restored to its former glory. Discussions between the Society and the Dunedin City Council will be ongoing in 2011 to see what can be done to repair the site.