The Dunedin Amenities Society

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Students and tutors from the Otago Polytechnic Arboriculture course spent three days at Craigieburn undertaking some essential work on the reserve’s trees. The students removed deadwood and damaged branches from the large macrocarpa shelter belt in the main paddock. The programme is the second year of three-year partnership between the Otago Polytechnic and the Craigieburn Committee where the site is used for training purposes. Craigieburn Project Manager Paul Pope asked the students to put… Read More

The continued debate over the process of selection of art in public places continues with the recent furore over the selection of Julia Morison’s giant worm sculpture, Ouroboros at the Botanic Gardens.  With local artists including the Otago Sculpture Trust claiming the request for proposal process was unfair and poorly managed. There has been consistent pattern of controversy and outcry that has dogged the placement of artworks in public places in Dunedin over recent years. Rachael Rakena’s… Read More

The recent damage of the sea wall at St Clair Esplanade is a pertinent reminder of the power and ferocity of the ocean and the continuation of an issue that has been prominent in Dunedin since the beginnings of colonial settlement. The extension of physical occupation of coastal areas by people and the development of infrastructure around that occupation has been fraught with problems. Worse still has been the undermining of the important… Read More

Members of the Dunedin Amenities society will be saddened to learn of the passing of Society life member Les Cleveland. Les was a man of outstanding achievements, businessman, philanthropist, regional councillor, environmentalist, family man, opera singer but above all, he was at heart, a gardener. Les trained in horticulture at the Dunedin Botanic Garden before embarking on a successful business career that led him into the wider fields of interest that he pursued with the vigour… Read More

Members of the Dunedin Amenities Society met with Council staff and its engineering consultants this morning to review the recent bush clearance below the dam face. The clearance of any native bush area is always something that should be mourned, but the nature of the dam and its purpose has meant that it is unavoidable. Today’s inspection showed that the City Council have reduced the bush clearance from the original 5000 square… Read More

The Dunedin City Council will be clearing approximately 5000 square metres of native bush on the eastern and western portions of the current earth dam. The Society have raised a number of concerns over this project in relation to the environmental and recreational compensation that Council should provide in lieu of the clearance work. It’s clear that the City Council have an infrastructural need to upgrade the dam for safety and to bring… Read More

The Society will hold its 124th Annual General Meeting on Tuesday 16th of April at the Botanic Gardens Centre (next to the Opoho Bowling Club) in Lovelock Avenue at 5.30pm. The guest speaker for the meeting will the City Council’s Heritage Policy Planner, Dr Glen Hazelton. The topic of Dr Hazelton’s address will be “Heritage Buildings and Seismic Implications.” With the advent of the Christchurch earthquakes and the government looking at changes… Read More

One of the most famous lines from “The Wizard of Oz” is when Dorothy says to her little dog “Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.” That particular line has become a cultural metaphor used when we visit places or see things  that are not familiar to us and we relate them back to our own personal vision of the world. That same cultural metaphor may well apply to the proposals being… Read More

A Conservation Conundrum The Dunedin City Council is presently undertaking a review of the District Plan  and that review will mean that the Dunedin Amenities Society will also be looking at the implications of those changes. The review includes looking at creating a new open space, reserves and recreation zone which would “reflect the different types of open space and recreation areas.” The current District Plan does not recognise reserve, conservation or recreation… Read More

The drawn out debate over the use of John Wilson Drive has been centred around people’s rights to access, or more accurately their right to use that access by vehicle. The political debate  disintegrated into a blatant popularity contest without any reasoned argument on what actually would provide the greatest benefit to the city. Councillors wanting the drive reopened to vehicles that spoke at the recent council meeting, only discussed their own embarrassment over the continuing issue. Not one councillor… Read More