The Dunedin Amenities Society

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John Wilson Drive continues to polarize the Dunedin community between those who want the opportunity to enjoy the area free of vehicles and those who see the change in use as a form of selfishness. The interesting point is that the Drive has never really been closed to the public, except when construction work was being undertaken on the pipeline and it was hazardous for the public. It’s worth remembering  that John Wilson… Read More

The Portobello Bowling Club has a small creek running through its property between Sherwood Street and the hotel in Portobello Road. The club has been working hard on improving its grounds and have developed a stream restoration plan to improve the visual aesthetics of the site and to provide better opportunities for native fish that inhabit the area. The Dunedin Amenities Society made a  financial contribution to the clubs project for the… Read More

Last year the Society made the decision to clear the gorse off the bank area below the western paddock down to Tanner Road. This was a key part of the restoration project and one that was much-needed for the reserve and the local area. It was a big job and we discovered gorse that was over 50 years old. We had contractors come in and cut the material down and the City Council’s… Read More

It was of particular interest to the Dunedin Amenities Society to read about the donation of a seat, rubbish bin, and rose garden on the corner of Hanover and Great King streets by Councillor Paul Hudson and his brother Michael Hudson (ODT 11th December 2010).  This generous gesture to the city was made by the Hudson’s to honour their parents, and is a welcome addition to the city’s streetscape. Imagine the Amenities… Read More

The people pictured in the car  didn’t throw the rubbish out of the window, but have a look at how close the brand new bin is beside the parking area. Was it too much to walk over and put the remains of the Colonel’s secret herbs and spices into the bin? Littering like this makes our city look awful and casts a blight on our reputation as a clean green place to… Read More

There’s no doubt that the scrap yard along the motorway adjacent to the Oval is a work in progress. It’s hard to know whose work in progress it belongs too though. Is it the City Council’s District Plan for allowing this activity in the first instance? Perhaps it belongs to Transit for its lack of any vegetation on the adjacent area which fails to create any coherent screening from both visual and noise effects? Or is it the landowners at Everitt’s… Read More

Recently the Society have been wondering what age the 52 mature rimu trees are at Craigieburn. It’s a very common question asked by visitors to the site and one that is difficult to answer with any real certainty. Recently as part of the project the trees were mapped with GPS technology to enable mapping of the physical changes to the vegetation brought about by colonial occupation. While undertaking the mapping project the girth… Read More

The Dunedin Amenities Society has always recognised the importance and prestige for Dunedin in having an internationally acclaimed botanic gardens in our City. The Gardens and its staff  provide a standard of  excellence in Dunedin that is not found in many cities around the world. Importantly the gardens provides industry training that develops new generations of horticulturists and plant collection managers through the apprentices who study and train within its grounds. Sadly, that international recognition and reputation is neither valued or recognised  by the majority of Dunedin’s… Read More

It was great to see the article in this weeks Star highlighting the open day at Craigieburn. Many thanks to those who provided feedback on the open day. The Society looks forward to keeping up the momentum of the project so that the area continues to be part of Dunedin’s must see sites. The Star Article

Students from the Otago Polytechnic Horticulture course visited Craigieburn with their tutor Lisa Burton yesterday. The Otago Polytechnic has had a long term relationship with the reserve and began planting native trees on the reserve in 1995. With totara, miro and matai now reaching 3-5 metres in height it was great to show the present students the work that their peers have undertaken over the last 15 years. What started out as a… Read More