The Dunedin Amenities Society

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The development of a pilot education programme with Toitu – Otago Settlers Museum is a great opportunity to bring the Craigieburn story to a new and young audience. As an organisation the Dunedin Amenities Society has a role in providing opportunities for learning with a view to developing the future landscape, environmental and heritage stewards of the future. That’s a mantle we should be prepared to pass onto others not as a burden but… Read More

Trees in the urban context perform a vital function for the health and welfare of city’s across the world. Dunedin is not alone in the vital environmental and aesthetic services that they provide in the city landscape. In fact to some extent trees are often undervalued for the essential biological services that they provide that enhance to both human and biodiversity health. Such ecological services include creating biodiversity corridors,  reducing water run off,… Read More

It was with an immediate eye on the skies above on Sunday morning that members of the Society started their day. With all of the planning and worrying seeing it dawn beautifully fine and clear took away any of those feelings of apprehension. This was our big day to share and celebrate with Dunedin the Amenities Society’s 125th Anniversary, and what a day it turned out to be. With over 520 people undertaking the Traverse… Read More

Otago Polytechnic Horticulture students spent a day planting native trees and shrubs at Craigieburn recently. The planting was the 19th year of the planting project by the Polytechnic Horticulture students at the Craigieburn Reserve. The planting was a continuation of the last three years work strengthening the bush line along the central paddock. Otago Polytechnic Horticulture students began planting native trees in the 1.5 acre grassy open paddock on the western boundary… Read More

Students and tutors from the Otago Polytechnic Arboriculture course spent three days at Craigieburn undertaking some essential work on the reserve’s trees. The students removed deadwood and damaged branches from the large macrocarpa shelter belt in the main paddock. The programme is the second year of three-year partnership between the Otago Polytechnic and the Craigieburn Committee where the site is used for training purposes. Craigieburn Project Manager Paul Pope asked the students to put… Read More

The recent damage of the sea wall at St Clair Esplanade is a pertinent reminder of the power and ferocity of the ocean and the continuation of an issue that has been prominent in Dunedin since the beginnings of colonial settlement. The extension of physical occupation of coastal areas by people and the development of infrastructure around that occupation has been fraught with problems. Worse still has been the undermining of the important… Read More

Members of the Dunedin Amenities Society met with Council staff and its engineering consultants this morning to review the recent bush clearance below the dam face. The clearance of any native bush area is always something that should be mourned, but the nature of the dam and its purpose has meant that it is unavoidable. Today’s inspection showed that the City Council have reduced the bush clearance from the original 5000 square… Read More

The Dunedin City Council will be clearing approximately 5000 square metres of native bush on the eastern and western portions of the current earth dam. The Society have raised a number of concerns over this project in relation to the environmental and recreational compensation that Council should provide in lieu of the clearance work. It’s clear that the City Council have an infrastructural need to upgrade the dam for safety and to bring… Read More

The Society were pleased to host members of the Southern Heritage Trust at Craigieburn on a stunning autumn day on Saturday 13th April. The trust members took a 2 hour guided tour of the Craigieburn area with project manager Paul Pope. Trust members were very interested to hear the detailed history of the Rankin, Sherriff and Tanner families who farmed the area from 1860, and enjoyed seeing the archaeological and restoration efforts of the Society for… Read More

One of the most famous lines from “The Wizard of Oz” is when Dorothy says to her little dog “Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.” That particular line has become a cultural metaphor used when we visit places or see things  that are not familiar to us and we relate them back to our own personal vision of the world. That same cultural metaphor may well apply to the proposals being… Read More