The Craigieburn Byre Completion

The Craigieburn ByreThe Craigieburn Byre is an intriguing structure that has been an academic and physical challenge to interpret and restore. The scale of the stone armouring and stock race combined with the nature and layout of the internal building provide a tantalising insight into the nature of early farming practices in Dunedin. A recent visit to the site by Prof Norman Hammond and his wife Jean Wilson, was a rare opportunity for discussion about the nature of the site and the construction of the byre building. Prof Hammond is Emeritus professor of Archaeology at Boston University and was in Dunedin this week to give a national lecture series on the ancient American Mayan civilisation. It was a fantastic opportunity for the restoration team to have someone of his skill and knowledge share our excitement for Colonial New Zealand archaeology at Craigieburn.

While Prof Hammond was at Craigieburn there was also time to look at the restoration work on the stone wall. With the recent weather work has been slow due to saturated ground conditions.  However, with the arrival of some warmer, drier conditions stone mason Stuart Griffith has been able to complete the repairs to the southern end of the wall. Work is expected to be completed in stabilising the wall over the next two weeks.

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2 thoughts on “The Craigieburn Byre Completion

  1. Hey the finished article is impressive indeed – amazing what was still under the turf. Congratulations to the team that did all this painstaking recovery of a slice of Dunedin’s history.

    regards
    Mick

    • Its been a labour of love and one that has given the team immense pleasure in uncovering. It has also thrown up a number of questions about the nature of Colonial occupation in Dunedin by Scottish settlers. What has been fantastic is the public support that we have had from people visiting the area and from the immediate neighbours. The Society is looking forward to sharing the site with the public so that they can learn more about their pioneering heritage. Regards Daseditor

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